Madison Business – HSMC Ohio http://hsmcohio.com/ Wed, 18 May 2022 22:33:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hsmcohio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default-150x150.png Madison Business – HSMC Ohio http://hsmcohio.com/ 32 32 Stay tuned – Towne Post Network https://hsmcohio.com/stay-tuned-towne-post-network/ Wed, 18 May 2022 22:33:28 +0000 https://hsmcohio.com/stay-tuned-towne-post-network/ Post views: 50 Piper Madison talks musical growth and returning to Louisville Writer / Rick Redding Photograph provided Piper Madison has had her heart set on becoming a pop star for most of her 19 years. It’s not a pipe dream, as the singer has a few self-produced albums under her belt and […]]]>



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Piper Madison talks musical growth and returning to Louisville

Writer / Rick Redding
Photograph provided

Piper Madison has had her heart set on becoming a pop star for most of her 19 years. It’s not a pipe dream, as the singer has a few self-produced albums under her belt and a huge following on social media, and was also voted by LEO Weekly readers as the best band/musician performing original music. .

While her career might be considered a family business in its own right, Madison sees herself as a do-it-yourself artist. The family includes her Louisville parents, Patrick and Rhonda Keesee, and her younger sister Skylar.

She produces her own music and performs as a solo artist, having mastered the use of a device called a looper which allows her to add the sounds of instruments while performing live.

“I consider myself a DIY independent artist,” she said. “I’m a musician but also an entrepreneur, and I have a lot of other things that I try to incorporate.”

Madison’s start in show business began at an early age, and she was so promising as an actress and performer that the family decided to move to Los Angeles when she was just 9 years old. They moved back to Louisville during the summers, but she and Skylar think of LA as where they spent those formative years.

Both girls managed to land modeling and acting gigs. Madison’s big breakthrough came at age 13 when she landed the role of Zelphaba on the Nickelodeon series “100 Things To Do Before High School.”

She released her debut album, “Who’s Running Your Mind,” in 2019 when she was 16. Her single from that record, “Little Bit of Rain”, reached number 14 on Billboard’s weekly dance club song chart.

Her second album, “How Do I Love?”, was released last fall, coinciding with her family’s return to Louisville – a direct result of the pandemic. She said her music was a great way to maintain her creativity during those years in Los Angeles, especially between acting gigs.

“I actually started writing and listening to music between auditions because acting was kind of crazy, up and down and unpredictable, so in the down times I picked up some steam. music,” she said.

She quickly discovered that music was the creative outlet she wanted to pursue. With the release of “How Do I Love?”, she began airing on local station WFPK, received the LEO Weekly Award, and performed a few gigs at local outlets including the Blind Squirrel. His family invested in marketing, including billboards, to boost their numbers on sites like Spotify. An October album release party was held at The Black Rabbit in St. Matthews.

Madison also seems to have a rare gift for business. Unlike other rising stars, she does her own social media, posting on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and other social media, while also making sure her music is available on sites like Spotify and Amazon Music.

“I’m a musician but also an entrepreneur,” says Madison. “I find the best way to do anything is to start and see every failure as a necessary learning experience.”

The hard work is already paying off. Her music found over 90,000 listeners on Spotify alone last year, prompting her to post the numbers on Instagram with this inspirational message:

“When I made this post last year, I couldI never imagined it could get better. I do not have anyI don’t do it for the numbers – I do it for the positive impact and the real, authentic connections created. Even so, seeing this growth is heartwarming. Thisis the reflection of all the work that I havedid, inside and out. II am extremely grateful for the progress I havedid this year, and all the people in my life who helped make it happen. If you have a dream, follow it. Live and breathe it; know when to relax and take a step back if necessary, but work with passion and you will achieve all that you seek in this life. This is proof that heit’s possible. II’m just a girl from Louisville, KY, living her dreams. If I can do it, so can you. 2022, here we come!

As for playing her music in public, at 19, she’s limited in where she can play. In Los Angeles, she says she had a band she played with, but improvised when the family moved to Louisville last fall. She calls it a fun challenge to play instruments with her looper device.

Her repertoire includes original songs from two albums and a mix of covers from artists she admires, including Amy Winehouse, Sia, Grace Potter and Sade. Her cover of Aretha Franklin’s “(You Make Me Feel) Like a Natural Woman” was seen as a bold choice to be part of WFPK’s web series “Peace, Love and Louisville,” a tribute to 1960s songs .

Madison’s life is not limited to music. When talking about returning to Louisville from Los Angeles, she’s quick to point out her interest in spending time outdoors, as well as her focus on mindfulness.

“It’s really peaceful here,” she said. “In Los Angeles, it’s completely different. It’s lively and super busy. There is a kind of calm that I really like.

She is making the most of being at home. For Christmas, his parents allowed him to convert a space previously used as an attic to create a photo studio. Then she immediately posted several creative photographs.

While Madison says her main goal is to eventually become a touring actor and perform on the road, she’s still 19 and has yet to graduate from college. There’s an offer to attend the prestigious Berklee College of Music in Boston, but she says her future is more likely to include undergraduate studies at Center College in Danville, a bit closer to home and family. .

When describing her second album last fall, she said something about it that still rings true, even as she works on her next musical project: “It’s kind of a continuation of my mental, emotional and spiritual that I started with this first album. .”

It will be interesting to see where Madison’s journey takes her.

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3 top stocks to buy in a market downturn | Smart Change: Personal Finances https://hsmcohio.com/3-top-stocks-to-buy-in-a-market-downturn-smart-change-personal-finances/ Mon, 16 May 2022 11:56:00 +0000 https://hsmcohio.com/3-top-stocks-to-buy-in-a-market-downturn-smart-change-personal-finances/ (Selena Maranjian) When the stock market goes down, the shares of many great companies go on sale. The market is already in sharp decline in 2022 — the S&P500, for example, recently fell 17% year-to-date. There are plenty of stocks at attractive prices right now – but if there’s another pullback in the market, it […]]]>

(Selena Maranjian)

When the stock market goes down, the shares of many great companies go on sale. The market is already in sharp decline in 2022 — the S&P500, for example, recently fell 17% year-to-date. There are plenty of stocks at attractive prices right now – but if there’s another pullback in the market, it may be hard to resist plenty of bargains.

Here are three solid companies whose stocks you might want to take a closer look at and consider for your long-term portfolio, should their price drop further.

Image source: Getty Images.

Salesforce.com (NYSE: CRM), the global leader in customer relationship management (CRM), explains that it “allows businesses of all sizes and across industries to digitally transform and create a 360° view of their customers.” Customer management is quite important for a myriad of businesses, as it can involve keeping track of them and their preferences, optimizing communications with them, and delivering personalized experiences. Such things can increase customer satisfaction and loyalty.

People also read…

Salesforce is one of the first software as a service (SAAS) companies, with many cloud-based services. It claims more than 150,000 companies as customers, from small to very large. In its most recent fiscal year, the company delivered 25% year-over-year revenue growth to $26.5 billion, and 25% growth in operating cash flow, even though earnings per share were in the red. The company faces headwinds, such as Microsoftcompeting CRM offerings and what some see as over-diversification on the part of the company.

Still, he remains the top dog in his field and continues to grow by double digits. It generates a large portion of its revenue through subscriptions, which is a business model that many investors love, as this revenue is quite recurring. Additionally, it benefits from the competitive advantage of switching costs, as it can be difficult for customers to switch to another provider once they use a suite of Saleforce services.

Salesforce stock recently fell 46% from its 52-week high. If it falls further, its appeal as an investment opportunity will only grow.

2.Pinterest

pinterest (NYSE: PINS) has seen its shares fall in recent months. At the time of this writing, shares of growth stocks are down about 74% from their 52-week high.

The company calls itself “the visual discovery engine” – “where you find and do what you love”. Specifically, it is a social media platform where users share products, styles, and designs (as well as recipes, inspirational quotes, and fitness tips, among others) that they like. It works – because there are over 400 million monthly active users (more than half of which are outside the US), and together they’ve logged over 240 billion “pins”.

In the company’s first quarter, revenue grew 18% year-over-year to $574.9 million, in what CEO and co-founder Ben Silbermann called a “macroeconomic environment and difficult geopolitics”. He also noted that “Pinterest made good progress in the first quarter in executing our long-term strategy. We continued to evolve our native content and creator ecosystem, began beta testing your store, our Surface custom shopping experience, and released our new open Pinterest API so any developer can build apps for Pinners, Creators, Merchants, and Advertisers.” Much of Pinterest’s value lies in its potential to monetize its large user base – and the company is clearly working on this – for example, by developing ways to help users quickly find and buy items that interest them.

A big advantage for Pinterest is that it knows a ground on its members, because it can track what they watch, record and follow. Thus, it is able to provide sellers with well-qualified potential buyers. Pinterest’s user base has dwindled a bit recently, which has investors worried. Research the company before investing in it – if you think the contraction is temporary, consider buying if the stock falls further. Otherwise, move on to another company.

3.Walt Disney

Finally, there is waltz disney (NYSE: DIS), which requires little introduction for most people. But while you probably know a lot about the company, you might not appreciate how many irons it has in various fires. There are the Disney theme parks, of course, but also Walt Disney Studios, Walt Disney Animation Studios, Pixar Animation Studios, Marvel Studios, 20th Century Studios, Searchlight Pictures, Lucasfilm, ABC TV, FX, National Geographic, ESPN, the Disney+ streaming service, and part of Hulu.

The stock has been hammered, down 43% recently from its 52-week high, but its outlook is certainly no worse 43% than it was a few months ago. Indeed, in the company’s second quarter, revenue grew 23% year over year, with its “Parks, Experiences and

The “Products” division saw its turnover more than double. CEO Bob Chapek said, “Our strong second quarter results, including fantastic performance in our national parks and continued growth in our streaming services, with 7.9 million Disney+ subscribers added during the quarter . [totaling a whopping 137.7 million] and the total number of subscriptions in all our [direct-to-consumer] bids exceeding 205 million – once again proved that we are in a league of our own.”

Some may punish Disney in light of netflixDisney’s slowing growth and stock market crash, but Disney has a lot to do, including a slew of potential blockbuster movies coming out this year and new technologies and operational tools at its parks that can generate more revenue.

Disney is built to last, with many valuable franchises and a diverse set of revenue streams. The stock already looks attractive, with a price-to-sales ratio and forward-looking price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio well below five-year averages. If equities fall further, they will only be more attractive.

There are many strong and promising stocks that have fallen to attractive levels. Take a closer look at the ones that interest you, as bear markets are good times to buy stocks.

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Selena Maranjian holds positions at Microsoft, Netflix, Salesforce.com and Walt Disney. The Motley Fool holds positions and endorses Microsoft, Netflix, Pinterest, Salesforce.com and Walt Disney. The Motley Fool recommends the following options: January 2024 long calls at $145 on Walt Disney and January 2024 short calls at $155 on Walt Disney. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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Madison’s Mom Makes Authentic African Print Kids Clothes https://hsmcohio.com/madisons-mom-makes-authentic-african-print-kids-clothes/ Sat, 14 May 2022 21:45:00 +0000 https://hsmcohio.com/madisons-mom-makes-authentic-african-print-kids-clothes/ MADISON, Wis. – A mom from Madison started a business creating clothes with authentic African prints and patterns. It all started when Nina Akli’s daughter Alise was about a year old. “I was looking for African print clothes for her in Madison, and I couldn’t find any. So I went online, and it was just […]]]>

MADISON, Wis. – A mom from Madison started a business creating clothes with authentic African prints and patterns.

It all started when Nina Akli’s daughter Alise was about a year old.

“I was looking for African print clothes for her in Madison, and I couldn’t find any. So I went online, and it was just too expensive,” Akli said. “So I was like, ‘ You know what, I’ll just do mine.”‘

People immediately noticed Alise’s clothes.

“We started attending different events around the city,” Akli said. “People started asking me, ‘Oh, where did you get your clothes? We want to buy some too.'”

It was then that Afribbean Baby was born. Akli, student services coordinator at UW-Madison by day, already knew how to sew. But she had to perfect the craft.

“I had the basic skills, but I’m learning visually,” she said. “I just jumped on YouTube, and I was watching videos of people sewing, and then just trying to go and sew things.”

From time to time, his “assistant” gives him a hand.

“Sometimes I help my mom to sew,” Alise said with a big smile on her face.

Her son JJ is only one year old so he is not able to help yet.

Akli finds the fabric online, mostly from African artists.

“I have a few different referral providers. I like to make sure they’re genuine,” she said. “Most of them are from Ghana.”

The Progress Center for Black Women has been integral to its success. It’s her second home and a way to find resources and support for her business.

In recent years, its clientele has continued to grow.

“Around holidays, like Christmas, it’s really busy for me,” Akli said. “Black History Month, and Juneteenth too.”

She can also keep busy around Mother’s Day, creating matching mommy and me sets.

This means for her that she can help other families to wear the styles of their cultures.

“I myself am half Congolese, therefore Central African, and my husband is from Ghana. African print is really important to us,” she said. “To pass it on to our children, but also to share it with other people.”

Akli will be installed at Madison Makers Market on June 18.

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Hundreds of people to receive diplomas and certificates in ceremony at HCCC https://hsmcohio.com/hundreds-of-people-to-receive-diplomas-and-certificates-in-ceremony-at-hccc/ Fri, 13 May 2022 00:30:00 +0000 https://hsmcohio.com/hundreds-of-people-to-receive-diplomas-and-certificates-in-ceremony-at-hccc/ HERKIMER – Herkimer County Community College will hold its 54th kickoff on Friday, May 13 at 4 p.m. in the Physical Education Building. There are 337 graduates and degree and certificate applicants eligible to participate, according to an announcement from college officials. Board Chair Isabella Crandall will preside over the ceremony. The national anthem will […]]]>

HERKIMER – Herkimer County Community College will hold its 54th kickoff on Friday, May 13 at 4 p.m. in the Physical Education Building.

There are 337 graduates and degree and certificate applicants eligible to participate, according to an announcement from college officials.

Board Chair Isabella Crandall will preside over the ceremony.

The national anthem will be sung by Adriana Doria Davis Sumter, a 2022 graduate of Dobbs Ferry’s music industry program and signed by Peyton McKinney, a 2022 graduate of Herkimer’s business administration program.

The invocation and blessing will be given by Reverend Tamara K. Razzano, pastor of First Presbyterian Church, Little Falls.

The procession will be led by Associate Professor Blake Pitcher, faculty representative and mass bearer.

Student Government Association President Ryan Packard of Oneonta; Herkimer
County Legislature Speaker Vincent J. Bono; New York State Assemblymen Robert J. Smullen and Brian Miller; New York State Senate Members Peter Oberacker and James Tedisco; and Herkimer College Academic Senate Chair Lisa Elwood-Farber will greet students and guests, the announcement added.

The student address, Red Light, Green Light, will be given by Kassandra Garcia, a 2022
graduated from the communication and media program in Rome.

The degrees will be conferred by President Cathleen C. McColgin, with assistance from Provost Michael Oriolo.

Admission to the ceremony is by ticket only. Non-ticket holders can view a live webcast of the ceremony at www.herkimer.edu/commencement.

A reception for the graduates and their guests will be held immediately after the ceremony.

Local graduates and candidates for diplomas and certificates are:

Camden

Hollie LH DePasquale, medical coder/transcriptionist; Brittni SL Hébert, personal services; and Melissa L. Jessie, business administration;

Canastota

Elora G. Wilmot, General Studies;

cassville

Katelynn R. Phalen, physiotherapist assistant;

Cazenovia

Michaela AY Kelly, Legal Studies;

chadwick

Katrinia M. Carro, Business Administration;

Chittenango

Collin A. Shelton, assistant physical therapist;

clinton

Ericka M. Arancio, social services;

cold stream

Christopher Gauthier, criminal justice; Nathan Jenkins, Basic Police Training; Carliza E. Roark, early childhood education; Jack D. Shelhamer, communication arts/music industry; and Haley M. Wood, social services;

Cooperstown

Andrea R. Mills, Travel/Events Management;

De Ruyter

Catherine J. Chapman, physiotherapist assistant;

Deerfield

Isabella R. DeStefanis, small business management;

Dolgeville

Vincent E. Armstrong, physical education; Carla J. Lyon, general studies; Hannah F. Napier, social services; and Tyler Perkins, basic police training;

Earlville

Sage E. Ashton, General Studies;

Frankfurt

Anesa Begic, health professions; Kody J. Curtis, IT; Coreena
Mr. DeJohn, social services; Sarah O. Hamilton, art studio; Maureen P. Kimbrell,
social science; Anna G. McDonald, general studies; William R. Pocyntyluk Jr., human resources management; Hailey A. Traut, General Studies; Riley J. Wisheart, General Studies; Kiley M. Wren, General Studies; and Brayden M. Zahniser, crime/intelligence
analysis;

hamilton

Emily M. Conroe, physical therapist assistant; and Trey J. Miller, business
administration;

Herkimer

Santino V. Aceto, business administration; Casey N. Buckley, early childhood education; William G. Cook, business administration; Heather N. Devitt, accounting; Sarah L. Eastwood, health professions; Kasey L. Eisenbrey, social services; Besim Ferhatovic, business administration; Michael Hagan, Basic Police Training; Matthew Franklin Kelly, General Studies;

Ross M. Klein, accounting; Katelyn E. Lowell, health professions; Mitchel F. Martinez, IT; Braxton A. McKinney, business administration; Peyton E. McKinney, business administration; Julia K. Perkins, general studies; McKenzie A. Pine, business administration; Jianna Scalise, early childhood education; Alyssa F. See, science; John Verenich, forensic investigations; Kayleigh R. Voce, General Studies; Kaitlyn P. Wells, General Studies;

Dutch patent

Christopher E. Cater, Quality Assurance/Science

Ilium

Jeff Chase, Basic Police Training; Timothy M. Day, electrical technology; Tanya L. Dowd, paralegal; Shelby L. Dunham, General Studies; Mikayla L. Evans, Criminal Justice;

Meretta L. Everson, health professions; Alexandria A. Feliciano, humanities; Paul
Mr. L. Gleba, accounting; Adam B. Goodhines, general studies;

Erin RL Jackson, business administration; Garth M. Joseph, Basic Police Training; Sianna M. Kenyon, physical education;

Taylor R. Larmon, small business management; Mark W. Loomis Jr., General Studies; James C. Marosek, paramedic/paramedic; Tiffany L. Nitka, quality
insurance/science; Stephanie J. Parkhurst, psychology;

Naomi N. Perez, criminal justice; Marla M. Proulx, Health Professions; Carmen A. Smith, criminal justice; Jacquie B. Sweeney, business administration; Haley NA Thomas, social services; Tanner H. Vogel, physical education; and Julia C. Yardley, social sciences;

Jordanville

Jensen E. Grescheck, General Studies; Hannah N. Young, early childhood education; Aliyah R. Gross, Early Childhood Education.

Leonardsville

Dana Bailey, early childhood;

small fall

Victoria L. Archer, human resources management; Erica A. Baldanza, science; Chase M. Bowman, criminal justice;
Jordan L. Brelinsky, social services; Riley E. Caracane, General Studies;

David P. Cook, computer/network security; Jada V. DeJesus, small business management; Kailee E. Jasewicz, Human Resources Management;

Adam W. Johnson, Basic Police Training; Neiko Scarano, basic police training; Michele L. Sheldon, General Studies;

Madison

Jennifer L. Hull, legal studies;

Mohawk

Mary K. Audycki, medical codifier/transcriptionist; Riley A. Brewer, criminal justice; MacKenzie R. Daley, art studio; Madalyn G. De Carr, Early Childhood Education;

Kayla R. Foti, social services; Sabrina C. Hunt, social services; Katarenna Pate, Basic Police Training; and Timothy C. Scharett, basic police training;

New Hartford

Camille E. Gossin, fashion and merchandising purchase; Jesse G. Ondrako, physical education; and Joseph S. Ondrako, physical education.

New York Mills

Gabrielle M. McNally, General Studies; Andrew M. Nichols, accounting; and Jerry L. Plows, social sciences;

Newport

Seth P. Arsenault, science; Braeton HE Henzel, computer network technology; Cameron M. Manchester, Business Administration;

Sean P. Spellman, social sciences; and Theodore C. Upson, business administration;

Oneida

Kayla M. Suppa, social services;

Poland

Christina E. Poplaski, accounting; and Robert F. Powers, general studies;

Perspective

Holly L. Ingersoll-Bozzuto, Crime/Intelligence Analysis;

Richfield Springs

Scott M. Ashley II, social services; Ara M. Homer, General Studies; Karen E. Lopez, medical coder/transcriptionist; and Luke J. Mahoney, legal studies;

Rome

Vincent DeGeorge, General Studies; Dawn A. Fanfarillo, Health Services Management Technology;

Kassandra M. Garcia, communications and media; Olivia M. Guy, Small Business Management; Christopher J. Hardin, accounting; Justin Losowski, assistant physiotherapist;

Xavier WM Mecca, business administration; Laura D. Noble, physical therapist assistant; Tara N. Quinn, paralegal;

Sarah A. Superak, forensic investigations; and Elyssa C. Vernold, paralegal;

Saint Johnsville

Michaela N. Monohan, paralegal; and CharliRose Seeley, social services;

Salisbury Center

Chloe D. Bryant, criminal justice; Zane R. Eckler, Computer/Network Security; Ashley A. Edick, physical therapist assistant; and Jamie L. Muir, business administration;

Sauquoit

Raquel DD Burton, crime/intelligence analysis; and Jordan M. Talma, medical coding/transcriptionist;

Utica

Mustafa Abdelrhman, health professions; Kla Awar, health professions; Lailar Be,
early childhood; Naila Civic, forensic investigations;

Katlin M. Cole, health professions;
Robert J. Conley, cybersecurity; Morgan S. Cool-Dineen, accounting; Mee Ra Da,
business Administration; Jorving A. Eduardo, small business management;

Alexis M. Fiore, Small Business Management; Moriah A. Giles, social services; Jennifer R. Goodman, human resources management;

Ashley M. Hyde, medical coding/transcriptionist; Michael J. Inman, Basic Police Training; Dylan M. James, social science; Shayla Thi Kim, forensic investigations;

Sonny M. Makoma, General Studies; Cha law Eh Paw, criminal justice; Ehdoh Paw, early childhood education; Kla Moo Paw, Business Administration; Alexis M. Platts, social sciences;

Mila M. Revill, social services; Jasmine M. Rivera, social services; Klur Doh Soe, business administration; Natachia R. Ventura, accountant; and Katherine L. Yaworski, social services.

Waterville

Alexander G. Hilley, legal studies;

west winfield

Katelyn I. Lincourt, Health Services Management Technology;

Whitesboro

Eric D. Burt Jr., accountant; Sean T. Christensen, business administration; Madison L. Cieslak, science; and Kelly A. Parker, paralegal.

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Lucas: Graduate Bryson Williams has a story to tell about perseverance https://hsmcohio.com/lucas-graduate-bryson-williams-has-a-story-to-tell-about-perseverance/ Wed, 11 May 2022 14:37:14 +0000 https://hsmcohio.com/lucas-graduate-bryson-williams-has-a-story-to-tell-about-perseverance/ History links BY MIKE LUCASSenior Writer UWBadgers.com MADISON, Wis. – They will hear Bryson Williams speak from the heart. They’ll learn how Wisconsin’s nose tackle turned academic rejection into redemption. They will learn how the 22-year-old “changed my whole life” to cross the finish line. They will learn how he persevered. […]]]>

BY MIKE LUCAS
Senior Writer UWBadgers.com

MADISON, Wis. – They will hear Bryson Williams speak from the heart. They’ll learn how Wisconsin’s nose tackle turned academic rejection into redemption. They will learn how the 22-year-old “changed my whole life” to cross the finish line. They will learn how he persevered.

Not only has Williams been selected to speak at the Wisconsin School of Business graduation celebration on Friday afternoon, but he will also speak at the Wisconsin School of Business student-athlete graduation reception. ‘UW that night. All of this will take place on the eve of Saturday’s opening ceremony at Camp Randall Stadium.

“Everyone asked, ‘Are you going to give the same speech twice?'” he asked. “Nope.”

And yet it will address and connect the student with the athlete, not mutually exclusive disciplines, not here. Soon armed with his degree (finance, investment and banking major), coupled with 39 games in four seasons in the trenches, he is well qualified to talk about such things.

“The most important thing that comes from being in a Division I program or any other type of sports program across the country, and especially Wisconsin, is that courage,” Williams pointed out. “It’s that determination that comes from being in a school and playing in a program like this.

“It’s knocked down and you have to really think about it just to get through.”

The summer before his sophomore year, Williams received some disheartening news. His application to the School of Business had been refused. This disappointment was compounded by a season-ending knee injury in November. His mental and physical tenacity/determination was being tested.

“Rejection from business school really changed my life for the better,” he admitted. “Before that, I didn’t take school as seriously. I didn’t take things outside the football field as seriously as I should have. Getting that rejection email was the wake-up call I needed. needed.

“It put my life on a straighter, more purposeful path. And from there my grades improved tremendously. I was getting A’s in classes where I should have gotten A’s. And I was getting A in classes that were even a little harder.

“Refusal is also why I started joining student organizations and developing relationships with highly motivated people who were focused on a similar career path. The whole journey has been part of the man I am now. I am about to graduate and I am extremely grateful.”

There was certainly some soul-searching during his sophomore year and he later admitted it in a social media post: “The last 365 days of my life have been anything but simple. From the school’s denial of trade in tearing the knee, losing important people, etc.

“There were a bunch of times where I felt like the world was against me.”

Asked about some of the sacrifices he had to make to ensure his overall growth, Williams went on to explain, “The whole period was fragile for me. Definitely a lot of lows. The people I lost didn’t necessarily hold me. back but were not part of the overall vision.

“Once I finally started making this change to do the things I wanted to do and be on the path to success – to be who I wanted to be – there were people I was close to at the time I I had to separate It was a difficult thing, especially when I was going through such hardships.”

It has a captivating story to tell. That’s why he filled out an application, a 300-word summary of why he should speak to business school graduates. His resilience was a selling point. Much like his identity as a football player in giving what he called a “holistic” view of student-athletes.

“I was lucky to be accepted,” said Williams, who last week presented a draft of his speech to an audience of two: the dean and associate dean of the School of Business. “It went really well… going through it made me feel very confident and took a bit of the stress off me.”

Since then, he “makes sure the delivery is as good as the content” in his nine-minute speech.

“I start applying to business school and I get rejected,” he said of the plan. “Then I really changed my whole life, did the things I needed to do to make the improvements and adjustments needed to be accepted in school. So, I met a little failure there.

“Then the next part of my speech addresses the Class of 2022’s perseverance through the pandemic…and the opportunities…the abundant opportunities this class presents us with in a whole new job market right now. I close with thanks- you on my behalf and on behalf of the whole class.”

Williams will share more of the same with his student-athlete peers.

“All my life I’ve always been someone who’s been very real about what’s going on and real about the situation I’m in,” he said. “And that helped me overcome some things. I understand the fact that I don’t need to play on Sunday and Monday nights to be successful in quotes.

“I can make my family proud. I can make myself proud. I can be happy outside of football. It’s something I’ve learned more and more through injuries. I feel so humbled to have was selected to be a student lecturer this weekend, the same way others were selected for the draft.”

He will remind his listeners of the two assemblies: “Everyone has his own way”.

• • • •

Williams’ journey began in Rockford, Illinois, an hour’s drive south of Madison. His high school years were spent in Lincoln, Nebraska, where he was twice selected to the all-state first team. After committing to the Badgers, he received a late recruiting push from new Cornhuskers coach Scott Frost.

But he stayed true to his word and to Wisconsin. He was one of the first registrants in first year.

Reflecting on his four plus years at Madison, he said: “So many good things have come out of some of the things that were bad that have happened in my life. I only have one life and I’d much rather not staying up at night thinking about things that might or might not have happened.

“I really don’t have any regrets about how it all turned out. I’ve had the most fun playing football this past season with my friends – and they’re really friends – all the D-line guys . I had so much fun doing this with them that it’s just hard for me to have any regrets at this point.”

He has memories, not the least of which was an assisted tackle in the 2021 home win over Iowa. The Badgers were protecting a two-possession lead in the third quarter when the Hawks faced a third-and-two from UW 41. Williams helped hold back Monte Pottebaum to a 1-yard gain.

On the fourth try, Pottebaum was again tackled by a gang and arrested; a turning point in the second half.

“I always wanted to be ready for any situation,” said Williams, who had three career starts, throughout his first season in 2018. “I trained like a rookie. trained just to get the opportunity to make a big play like that – to get a big save like that.

“When this opportunity came up and I took it, I was just happy with myself and being able to stay committed even though my college career didn’t necessarily turn out exactly the way I wanted. I stayed focused. and I continued to work hard when things went against me.”

Through the ups and downs, his biggest fan has always been his mother, Liz Calaway.

“I talk about it a bit in my speech,” he said. “My mum has been there for everything since I was born. She never missed a game. Things weren’t necessarily super easy growing up, but she made it seem like it was. Now I understand how really difficult things can be in the real world.

“I can’t even express how grateful I am to have the mother that I have and to have had her over me like she did. I never really understood how hard she worked until I got older and really thought about it. She worked hard.

His mother will be there for the graduation. So will his stepfather, father, grandfather, sister and brother, Donovan. In 2020, Donovan Williams was named Nebraska’s Mr. Basketball after leading the state in scoring (28.3 points). After two years at Oklahoma State, he transferred to Pacific University.

“He found a home,” Bryson said of 20-year-old Donovan, who, by a twist of fate, also had to undergo knee surgery. “We’ve always been there for each other. We always cheer each other on. I’m glad he gets another shot at this. He’s one of the toughest guys I know.”

Like so many footballers who have turned to other pursuits, Bryson Williams began to reshape her body. He weighed 315 at the end of last season. It’s down to 285. “I’ll probably find a comfortable weight around 265,” he said. “I don’t need to be 300 for no reason. I don’t want to be either.”

Williams still enjoys training and racing. Central Park in New York could be an option for the latter when he begins work on July 11 at the Morgan Stanley Building in Times Square in Manhattan. Williams had previously been a summer intern at Morgan Stanley.

“I knew going into college I wanted to do business and be part of business school,” he said. “But in terms of my career path, I really didn’t have too much idea. Through the resources available here and some of the organizations I joined, I figured out what that path looked like.”

His graduation speeches will reflect trials and tribulations, choices and journeys.

“I’m really ready (to move on) – I’m going to miss Madison, I love Madison,” he said. “I am extremely grateful and thankful for everything that has happened, good or bad, over the past four and a half years. It has really shaped the person I am today.”

Even though there is less of him, in the flesh, there is more to celebrate. More than ever.

Williams will thank her mother, Liz Calaway, when she remarked: ‘Things weren’t necessarily super easy growing up, but she made it seem like they were’

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Arrowhead Opens New Manufacturing Facility with Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers, Announces Receipt of Incentives https://hsmcohio.com/arrowhead-opens-new-manufacturing-facility-with-wisconsin-governor-tony-evers-announces-receipt-of-incentives/ Mon, 09 May 2022 14:30:00 +0000 https://hsmcohio.com/arrowhead-opens-new-manufacturing-facility-with-wisconsin-governor-tony-evers-announces-receipt-of-incentives/ PASADENA, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: ARWR) today held a groundbreaking ceremony in Verona, WI, at the site that will house a new approximately 160,000 square foot drug manufacturing facility and approximately 125,000 square feet of laboratory and office space to support process development and analytical activities. The company also announced that it has received […]]]>

PASADENA, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: ARWR) today held a groundbreaking ceremony in Verona, WI, at the site that will house a new approximately 160,000 square foot drug manufacturing facility and approximately 125,000 square feet of laboratory and office space to support process development and analytical activities. The company also announced that it has received awards of up to $16 million in tax increment funding from the City of Verona and up to $2.5 million in refundable tax credits from the City of Verona. State of Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation (WEDC) as incentives to invest in the local community and create new jobs.

“For many years, we have had a productive and mutually beneficial relationship with the local biotech community and the wider business community in the greater Madison, Wisconsin area. Arrowhead is excited to continue its partnership with Wisconsin and thanks the City of Verona for providing us with $16 million in tax increase funding and WEDC for providing us with $2.5 million in tax credits. refundable. These incentives are a great example of public-private partnerships that support continued investment in activities that generate new jobs in the region,” said Christopher Anzalone, Ph.D., President and CEO of Arrowhead. “I would also like to thank Lisa Johnson, President of BioForward, Mayor of Verona Luke Diaz, Secretary and CEO of WEDC Missy Hughes and Governor of Wisconsin Tony Evers for joining us to inaugurate the new manufacturing facilities and Arrowhead’s lab. These new facilities will help support the development, and ultimately commercialization, of potentially important new drugs that harness the natural RNAi pathway to target genes implicated in various diseases.

“Over the past several years, Wisconsin has been recognized as a powerhouse not only for discovering the latest advances in biopharmaceutical research and development, but also for manufacturing and producing these life-saving treatments,” said the Governor Tony Evers. “That means companies like Arrowhead can research new therapies for debilitating diseases, bring them to market, and manufacture them right here in Wisconsin. For me, it’s quite remarkable and worth the investment. So I’m proud to celebrate our state’s investment of $2.5 million in Project Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to expand its presence here in Wisconsin and create well-paying jobs for Wisconsin residents.

“WEDC is thrilled to partner with Arrowhead because they have the potential to transform healthcare – and all of our lives – through innovation, perseverance and collaboration,” said Missy Hughes, Secretary and CEO of WEDC. “Arrowhead joins a growing list of biopharmaceutical companies that have chosen to locate in Wisconsin because of the strategic investments our state has made in worker education and training, infrastructure and strong communities in recent years.

“I am delighted to support this project and the jobs it will bring to Verona,” said Verona Mayor Luke Diaz. “Arrowhead is a technology leader. Dane County is clearly positioning itself as an important center of innovation.

Key members of the construction project team include Eppstein Uhen Architects (USA), DPS Group, D’Onofrio Kottke & Associates, Smocke & Associates and Vogel Bros. Building Co.

Completion of the laboratory and offices is expected in 2023 and completion of the manufacturing plant is expected in 2024.

About Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals develops drugs that treat intractable diseases by silencing the genes that cause them. Utilizing a broad portfolio of RNA chemistries and effective delivery modes, Arrowhead therapies trigger the RNA interference mechanism to induce rapid, profound, and long-lasting inactivation of target genes. RNA interference, or RNAi, is a mechanism present in living cells that inhibits the expression of a specific gene, thereby affecting the production of a specific protein. Arrowhead’s RNAi-based therapies take advantage of this natural pathway of gene silencing.

For more information, please visit www.arrowheadpharma.com, or follow us on Twitter @ArrowheadPharma. To be added to the company’s mailing list and receive updates directly, please visit http://ir.arrowheadpharma.com/email-alerts.

Safe Harbor Statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act:

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the “safe harbor” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. All statements contained in this release, except historical information, can be deemed to be forward-looking statements. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, words such as “may”, “will”, “expect”, “believe”, “anticipate”, “hope”, “intend”, “plan ”, “plans”, “could”, “estimate” or “continue” are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. In addition, any statements referring to projections of our future financial performance, trends in our business, expectations regarding our product pipeline or product candidates, including regulatory submissions and anticipated clinical program results, prospects or the benefits of our collaborations with other companies or other descriptions of future events or circumstances are forward-looking statements. These statements are based on our current expectations and speak only as of the date hereof. Our actual results may differ materially and adversely from those expressed in forward-looking statements due to numerous factors and uncertainties, including the impact of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic on our business, the safety and efficacy of our products. candidates, decisions of regulatory authorities and their timing, the duration and impact of regulatory delays in our clinical programs, our ability to fund our operations, the likelihood and timing of receipt of future milestone and license fees, the future success of our scientific studies, our ability to successfully develop and commercialize drug candidates, the timing of the start and completion of clinical trials, the rapid technological evolution of our markets, the application of our intellectual property and other risks and uncertainties described in our most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and other documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission from time to time. We undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements to reflect new events or circumstances.

Source: Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

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US added 428,000 jobs in April despite soaring inflation | Economic news https://hsmcohio.com/us-added-428000-jobs-in-april-despite-soaring-inflation-economic-news/ Fri, 06 May 2022 13:23:14 +0000 https://hsmcohio.com/us-added-428000-jobs-in-april-despite-soaring-inflation-economic-news/ By PAUL WISEMAN – AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added 428,000 jobs in April, extending a strong hiring streak that defied punitive inflation, chronic supply shortages, Russia’s war on Ukraine and rising labor costs. much higher loan. Friday’s jobs report from the Labor Department showed last month’s hiring kept the unemployment rate […]]]>

By PAUL WISEMAN – AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added 428,000 jobs in April, extending a strong hiring streak that defied punitive inflation, chronic supply shortages, Russia’s war on Ukraine and rising labor costs. much higher loan.

Friday’s jobs report from the Labor Department showed last month’s hiring kept the unemployment rate at 3.6%, just above the lowest level in half a century.

The economy’s hiring gains have been surprisingly steady in the face of the worst inflation in four decades. Employers have added at least 400,000 jobs for 12 straight months.

At the same time, job growth in April, coupled with steady wage gains, will help fuel consumer spending and likely keep the Federal Reserve on track to sharply raise borrowing rates to combat inflation. Friday’s early trading in financial markets reflected fears that a strong labor market will keep wages and inflation high and push borrowing costs higher for consumers and businesses. Higher lending rates could, in turn, weigh on corporate profits.

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“With labor market conditions still going strong — including very fast wage growth — we doubt the Fed will abandon its hawkish plans,” said Paul Ashworth, chief U.S. economist at Capital Economics.

The latest employment figures contained some warnings about the labor market. The government has revised down its estimate of job gains for February and March by a total of 39,000.

And the number of people in the labor force fell by 363,000 in April, the first drop since September. Their exit slightly reduced the proportion of Americans working or looking for work from 62.4% to 62.2%. Many industries have been slowed by labor shortages. The country remains 1.2 million fewer jobs than at the start of 2020, just before the pandemic hit the economy.

“We need these people,” said Beth Ann Bovino, chief U.S. economist at S&P Global.

Bovino noted that some Americans remain on the fringes of the workforce due to lingering concerns about COVID-19 or due to difficulties finding affordable daycare for unvaccinated children.

Employers continued to grant wage increases last month. Hourly wages rose 0.3% from March and 5.5% from a year ago. But prices are rising faster than wages.

“Yes, we have seen an increase in wages,” Bovino said. But with inflation at its highest level in 40 years, “people are still under pressure”.

Across all industries last month, hiring was widespread. Factories added 55,000 jobs, the most since last July. Warehouses and transportation companies added 52,000, restaurants and bars 44,000, healthcare 41,000, finance 35,000, retailers 29,000 and hotels 22,000. Construction companies, which were slowed by shortages of labor and supplies, only added 2,000 people.

Still, it’s unclear how long the jobs boom will continue. The Fed this week raised its key rate by half a percentage point – its most aggressive move since 2000 – and announced further significant rate hikes to come. As Fed rate hikes take effect, they will make spending and hiring increasingly expensive.

In addition, the vast economic assistance that the government gave to households has expired. And Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has contributed to accelerating inflation and clouded the economic outlook. Some economists warn of a growing risk of recession.

So far, the resilience of the labor market is particularly striking against a backdrop of soaring prices and rising borrowing costs. This week, the Labor Department provided further evidence that the labor market is still booming. He reported that just 1.38 million Americans were collecting traditional unemployment benefits, the fewest since 1970. And he said employers posted a record 11.5 million job openings in March and that layoffs remained well below pre-pandemic levels.

In addition, the economy now has an average of two jobs available for every unemployed person. This is the highest proportion ever recorded.

And in another sign that workers are enjoying unusual leverage in the labor market, a record 4.5 million people quit their jobs in March, clearly convinced they could find a better opportunity elsewhere. .

Chronic shortages of goods, supplies and labor have contributed to skyrocketing prices – the highest rate of inflation in 40 years. Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in late February dramatically worsened the financial landscape, sending global oil and gas prices skyrocketing and severely clouding the domestic and global economic picture.

The Fed, which most economists say has been far too slow to recognize the inflationary threat, is now raising rates aggressively. Its goal is notoriously difficult: a so-called soft landing.

“Trying to slow the economy down just enough, without causing a recession,” said Rubeela Farooqi, chief U.S. economist at High Frequency Economics. “Their record on this is not particularly good.”

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Wisconsin athletes discuss mental health and communication https://hsmcohio.com/wisconsin-athletes-discuss-mental-health-and-communication/ Wed, 04 May 2022 07:06:50 +0000 https://hsmcohio.com/wisconsin-athletes-discuss-mental-health-and-communication/ FILE – “LB #22,” in honor of James Madison softball catcher Lauren Bernett, is written on the infield behind Liberty pitcher Emily Kirby, right, during an NCAA college softball game against Tennessee at Liberty Softball Stadium in Lynchburg, Virginia, April 27, 2022. Much has been made of the mental health issues that many young athletes […]]]>

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FILE – “LB #22,” in honor of James Madison softball catcher Lauren Bernett, is written on the infield behind Liberty pitcher Emily Kirby, right, during an NCAA college softball game against Tennessee at Liberty Softball Stadium in Lynchburg, Virginia, April 27, 2022. Much has been made of the mental health issues that many young athletes face, the pressures and vulnerabilities that can feel overwhelming, especially for those who feel forced to shield their pain from the outside world. (Kendall Warner/The News & Advance via AP, file)

PA

Wisconsin soccer player Emma Jaskaniec remembers being hesitant to get help before her first season when a psychologist approached the team to offer help to anyone in need.

“In my eyes, at least at that moment, I felt like if I was to reach out to him, it must have been like I was having really dark thoughts,” Jaskaniec said. “It wasn’t really normalized and it wasn’t like, ‘Oh, if you’re feeling anxious, you can contact him.’ I don’t think they wanted it to be like that, but I think in my eyes and in the eyes of a lot of other athletes, it felt like it had to be such a serious issue.

Jaskaniec said things have changed on campus over the past year — mental health is a more common topic in the locker room. It was also the topic of discussion Tuesday night for a panel of current and former Wisconsin athletes.

The event took place three weeks after the death of Wisconsin cross country and track runner Sarah Shulze, although it was scheduled well in advance. Shulze’s family announced last month that the 21-year-old took her own life on April 13.

“Balancing athletics, studies and the demands of everyday life overwhelmed her in one desperate moment,” Shulze’s family said in a statement. “Above all, Sarah was a power for good in the world.”

Shulze is one of three Division I athletes who have committed suicide in the past two months. Stanford soccer player Katie Meyer, goaltender for the Cardinal’s 2019 national championship team, died March 1. James Madison softball player Lauren Bernett, who helped the team get to the Women’s College World Series last year, died April 25.

Meyer’s family revealed that the 22-year-old took her own life. Rockingham County, Virginia, sheriff’s officials ruled Bernett’s death an apparent suicide last week, but said an investigation is ongoing.

All proceeds from Tuesday’s event went to the Sarah Shulze Foundation, which her family started to support women’s rights, student-athletes and mental health.

UNCUT Madison, the Wisconsin athlete-run nonprofit that organized Tuesday’s discussion, released a statement after Shulze’s death encouraging “institutions, athletic departments, policy makers and people across the countries to invest in resources that support student-athletes as they grapple with the pressures of playing a sport while studying full-time.

Panel members detailed these pressures. Chris Borland, a former All-American linebacker, said he hopes the NCAA can provide more protections and less time for student-athletes.

2011 Heisman Trophy finalist Montee Ball has opened up about his problems with alcohol, which ended his NFL career after two seasons with the Denver Broncos. Borland and Ball are now mental health advocates.

Jaskaniec said the pandemic has caused college athletes additional stress and has benefited from meditation.

Ball and Borland said they appreciate how athletes today are more open to talking about mental health issues than in the past.

“Kevin Love, I would say, kind of kicked things off,” Ball said of the NBA player from Cleveland who has been open about panic attacks and mental health issues. “Obviously we have a lot of other athletes doing the exact same thing. I think if you’re someone who has that stage, given the abilities to create a stage to talk about something, that’s something you need to talk about I’m starting to see the snowball effect that way.

Kris Eiring, a former sprinter from Wisconsin who now works as a sports psychologist, encouraged athletes to watch each other and go beyond the surface.

“We’re all so busy in our own worlds that we forget about our teammates,” Eiring said. “When you say, ‘How are you? when you pass by and they say “Awesome” you really don’t know. Maybe with the recent suicides, it can allow us to pause for a moment, just to check a little deeper. ‘Are you really okay?’ It would make a difference.

“You don’t have to solve your friend’s problem, but offer to go with a friend somewhere. I think we are afraid of this question because we may not know what to do. It’s okay if you don’t know what to do. The most important thing is that you are there and you are ready to walk with this person somewhere.

Jaskaniec said she sees these changes happening: “I was talking with one of my teammates earlier today. She says we feel like when we ask someone if we’re okay, especially with what happened, people actually start to open up more about how they really feel, what which I think is one of the biggest steps in taking the next direction.

“For things to get better, you actually have to seek help.”

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Madison Reed raises $33 million to expand store footprint https://hsmcohio.com/madison-reed-raises-33-million-to-expand-store-footprint/ Mon, 02 May 2022 16:57:30 +0000 https://hsmcohio.com/madison-reed-raises-33-million-to-expand-store-footprint/ Diving brief: After hiring a new chief financial officer in March, hair color brand Madison Reed announced it had raised $33 million in new funding, according to a company press release. The money will go towards growing the company’s “successful omnichannel business”. The funding was led by Sandbridge Capital and included participation from Marcy Venture […]]]>

Diving brief:

  • After hiring a new chief financial officer in March, hair color brand Madison Reed announced it had raised $33 million in new funding, according to a company press release. The money will go towards growing the company’s “successful omnichannel business”.
  • The funding was led by Sandbridge Capital and included participation from Marcy Venture Partners, co-founded by music artist Jay-Z.
  • Madison Reed plans to open 80 Hair Color Bar locations by the end of the year, hire 850 new colorists with full-time benefits, and invest in innovative products to expand its portfolio.

Overview of the dive:

As in-store shopping picks up again, Madison Reed is ramping up its omnichannel strategy to reach customers wherever they are. The company hired former Dollar Shave Club CFO Jose Zuniga as new CFO in March, with the intention of supporting digital and physical growth.

“Madison Reed’s innovative omnichannel approach maximizes convenience while delivering a modern and compelling customer experience at every level,” Ken Suslow, founder and managing partner of Sandbridge Capital, said in a statement.

The company has over 60 Hair Color Bar locations open and plans to expand its presence specifically in New York, South Florida, California, Chicago, Washington, DC and Texas. Madison Reed also plans to expand its wholesale business, which includes partners like Ulta (as well as its Target stores) and Amazon.

Madison Reed has been focused on rapid growth over the past few years, raise $52 million in February 2021. This latest round brings the company’s total capital raised to nearly $250 million to date. The company began offering free virtual hair color consultations last year and began selling men’s hair products in 2020. This is in addition to the company’s subscription-based at-home hair coloring offering. society. Like many retailers who have subscription-based modelsMadison Reed focused on adding more buying options to diversify her business.

Hair color market only continues to grow, expected exceed $40 billion by 2023, according to Statista. In fact, Madison Reed said it before. increased by 130% in 2020 and nearly doubled its customer base. Despite the impact of the pandemic on in-store retail, the company has been betting big on physical stores over the past two years while maintaining a strong digital presence, positioning itself to deliver an experience tailored to different customer preferences. clients.

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Madison school voters will decide on an income tax hike https://hsmcohio.com/madison-school-voters-will-decide-on-an-income-tax-hike/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:04:57 +0000 https://hsmcohio.com/madison-school-voters-will-decide-on-an-income-tax-hike/ It’s been 21 years since Madison schools saw residents approve a new school income tax for day-to-day school operations and it’s too long, he said. The 1,600-student Madison Schools, which has a single K-12 campus, is the “centerpiece” of Butler County’s rural community, Conley said. To exploreA first at Madison High School: students create a […]]]>

It’s been 21 years since Madison schools saw residents approve a new school income tax for day-to-day school operations and it’s too long, he said.

The 1,600-student Madison Schools, which has a single K-12 campus, is the “centerpiece” of Butler County’s rural community, Conley said.

To exploreA first at Madison High School: students create a theatrical podcast for the public

“We have good people in our school programs and in the administration, and they are people who care about us. I hear both pros and cons (on the tax issue) but I think it will pass and I hope it will,” he said.

There’s a lot at stake on Election Day, school officials said. Voters will decide on a 1% income tax to raise $2.4 million a year for the district, which has little commercial development and few business tax revenue streams to pay for school operations.

Currently, the district has an annual operating budget of $17 million funded in part by a previous 0.5% income tax paid by residents.

If voters approve the new 1% income tax on Tuesday, which is an ongoing tax problem with no year limit in effect, local residents would see a total of 1.5% of their earned income to fund Madison schools. .

School officials said the request for the tax hike was largely driven by a sharp cut in public funding for the school system compared to Ohio’s last biennial budget, which was approved in June with a new school funding formula.

If the proposed income tax hike fails, some budget cuts to school programs and staff will have to follow, officials have previously said.

Sandy Creach, treasurer of Madison’s school tax campaign, said “we’re rural and we don’t have all the businesses” that other school districts in the area rely on to fund their schools.

“Somebody has to put in the money for the schools,” Creach said. “And if we (the voters) wait and don’t pass it (the tax) now, the tax percentage will have to be higher the next time it’s on the ballot.”

“It’s the cheapest there is and we’re doing our best to pass it (the tax),” she said.

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