The Grinch strikes again: There is now a shortage of candy canes

Shoppers are discovering this week that it’s surprisingly difficult to collect candy canes to adorn trees or socks on Christmas Eve. Sweet Peppermint classics are the latest favorite of the season to hit 2021 holiday supply crisis. That’s right: there is a shortage of candy.

Money did some research and found that traditional peppermint candy canes are difficult to buy online right now. Most of the classic sugarcane options at specialty online retailers like Candy warehouse, Just candy and Spangler candies are listed as out of stock. Sugar cane selections at big box retailers like Amazon, Target, Walgreens, and Walmart are also much more limited than usual.

It’s not just regular consumers who face uptime issues. “We only got half of our order of candy canes for the holiday season and sold out almost immediately. We don’t currently have any in stock, ”said Mitchell Cohen, owner of Economy Candy in New York City. New York Post.

Why are there so many vacation shortages?

Candy canes aren’t the only treat that’s harder to find than usual this holiday season. There were also inventory issues with turkeys, cranberry sauce, Christmas trees, beer and wine, cream cheese and even Santa himself. (Santa’s artists are both rare and in high demand this year.)

Snags in the global supply chain and severe labor shortages Combined with a huge increase in consumer demand – all exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic – has caused disruptions in stocks of holiday favorites in supermarkets and malls across the country. Manufacturers are struggling to produce enough goods to satisfy their customers, and freighters are stranded in crowded ports awaiting unloading. Once the goods leave the ships, there are often not enough truck drivers to transport them to warehouses and retail stores.

Of course, not all supply chain disruptions should be viewed as a “shortage”. Christmas trees, although more expensive this year, were still available in many places. “Anyone who wants a real tree should be able to get one,” said Cheryl Nicholson, of the Wisconsin Christmas Tree Producers Association. Wisconsin State Farmer last month. Prices may be higher than some buyers would like, but that doesn’t mean the Christmas trees are sold out.

In the case of candy canes, a poor peppermint crop may be part of the reason for inventory problems leading up to Christmas 2021. US peppermint production fell 8.6% in 2020, according to The data of the Ministry of Agriculture. Production has fallen by around 25% since 2011.

Where to buy candy canes before Christmas

If you need to get your hands on a few peppermint candy canes this week, it’s worth heading to your local drugstore or supermarket to see if there are any left. If you’re shopping online, here are a few options that we’ve found to be available (although it’s not clear how long they’ll be in stock):

At many large retailers, boxes of novelty flavored candy canes (from Oreo to Hot Tamales candy to Starburst and Funfetti) are more readily available.


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4 ways the labor shortage could ruin your vacation plans

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